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Posts for tag: dental implants

By Drake Tollefson DDS
April 17, 2014
Category: Uncategorized
Tags: dental implants  
WhosAfraidofDentalImplantSurgery

Performing dental implant surgery involves placing a metal post inside the bone of the jaw, and ensuring that it fits so precisely and functions so well that you never notice the tooth replacement — and yet it can last for decades. Does it sound terrifically complex or painful? It's not! In fact, the procedure has a success rate of 95-97%, the highest of any tooth replacement option. Here's what you need to know about dental implant surgery.

A dental implant is designed to replace the root part of the tooth. To replace the visible part of the tooth, a crown, bridge or denture can be attached once the implant is secure — which may be the same day or several weeks later, depending on the individual situation. Dental implants are made of titanium (or its alloys), because this metal has a unique property: it's capable of fusing to bone, a process called osseo-integration.

Before placing the implant, a lot of planning goes on — typically involving X-rays (radiographs), and sometimes CT scans. This ensures that the operation itself goes smoothly. When it's time for the procedure you'll receive a local anesthetic, and we'll make sure you don't feel anything.

Next, we access the bone itself, often by making a small flap-like incision in the gum tissue. The living bone is handled with extreme care as a tiny amount is removed to make space for the implant. After the implant is fitted precisely in the bone, the gum tissue is closed, often with self-absorbing sutures (stitches) that don't need removal. And then the procedure's over.

Is implant placement painful? The simple answer is no — most people feel no pain during surgery and very little discomfort afterward. At most, you may experience some mild vibration during the bone preparation process. If you're nervous about the procedure, it's possible to have a sedative or anti-anxiety medication beforehand. Afterward, taking mild non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medication for a day or two is usually all you need to relieve any post-operative discomfort.

If you have questions about dental implant surgery, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can learn more in the Dear Doctor magazine articles “Dental Implant Surgery” and “Dental Implants.”

By Drake Tollefson DDS
December 20, 2013
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: crowns   dental implants  
WhichImplantCrownAttachmentisRightforYou

Dental implants have come a long way since their introduction thirty years ago. Unlike their predecessors, today’s implants come in various shapes and sizes that can meet the precise needs of individual patients. Crown attachment has also developed some variety.

The actual implant is a titanium post surgically imbedded in the jawbone to replace the original tooth root. The restoration crown, the visible part of the implant system that resembles natural tooth, is affixed to the implant post. There are two basic methods to attach the crown: cement it to an abutment that has been installed in the implant; or screw it into the implant with a retaining screw from the underside of the crown. In the latter case, the abutment has been built into the crown.

While either method provides years of effective service, one method may work better than the other depending on the circumstance. Screw-retained crowns require no cement and are more easily removed than cemented crowns if it becomes necessary. On the other hand, the screw access hole can be visible, although the area can be filled with a tooth-colored filling; and although rare, chips near the access hole can occur. Occasionally the screw may become loose, but tightening or replacing the retaining screw is a simple matter because of the access hole.

A cemented crown looks more like a natural tooth and so is more useful in situations where cosmetics are a factor. The cement, however, can cause inflammation and contribute to bone loss in some patients when excess cement gets below the gums. Unlike a screw-retained crown, removal is more difficult and limited.

As a rule, screw-retained crowns are normally used in areas where the screw hole is not conspicuous, such as for posterior (back) teeth. They’re also more desirable than cemented when the implant is permanently crowned at the same time it’s surgically implanted, a process called “immediate loading.”

Which method of crown attachment is best for you? That depends on the implant location and other factors we would explore during a thorough pre-implant exam. Either way, the end result will be a life-like replica of your natural teeth, and a restored, vibrant smile.

If you would like more information on crown attachment to dental implants, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “How Crowns Attach to Implants.”

By Drake Tollefson DDS
December 12, 2013
Category: Oral Health
Tags: dental implants   tooth loss  
ItCouldbeMoreThanaToothYoureLosing

There’s more to tooth loss than you might think. Because teeth are part of a larger system that facilitates speaking, eating and digestion, a lost tooth could eventually affect your overall health.

Tooth loss is actually about bone loss. As living tissue, bone continually reforms in response to stimuli it receives from the body. The alveolar bone (which surrounds and supports the teeth) receives such stimuli as the teeth chew and bite, as well as when they contact each other. All these stresses — hundreds a day — transmit through the periodontal ligament to the bone, stimulating it to grow and remodel.

A lost tooth reduces this stimulation and causes the alveolar bone to resorb (dissolve) — as much as 25% of its width the first year alone. Unless the process is stopped, the underlying basal bone and the periodontal (gum) tissue will begin to resorb too. Without this structural support the facial height shrinks and the front teeth begin to push forward, making chewing and speaking more difficult. These teeth begin performing functions outside their normal range, leading to damage and possible loss.

The primary goal of oral hygiene and dental care is to prevent tooth loss. When tooth loss does occur, however, it’s then important to restore the lost tooth with an artificial replacement if at all possible — not only to regain form and function, but to also stop further bone loss.

While the fixed partial denture (FPD), also known as a fixed bridge, has been the restoration of choice for many decades, dental implants may be the better long-term option. Although more expensive initially, implants can achieve a life-like restoration without involving or altering adjacent teeth as with FPDs. Plaque retention and tartar accumulations are much less likely with an implant, and the bone-loving quality of titanium, the metal used for implants, actually encourages bone growth. As a result, implants have a much higher longevity rate than FPDs.

Taking care of your teeth through effective hygiene practices and regular checkups may help you avoid tooth loss altogether. But if it can’t be avoided, restoring lost teeth is the single most important thing you can do to prevent even greater problems down the road.

If you would like more information on dental implants, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “The Hidden Consequences of Losing Teeth.”

By Drake Tollefson DDS
July 19, 2013
Category: Oral Health
TheEffectsofMissingTeeth

If you are one of the millions of Americans with missing teeth, then you're probably aware of some of the obvious side effects. You may feel self-conscious during conversations or simply avoid smiling altogether to conceal your dental issue. It is not uncommon for missing teeth to affect your confidence, but did you know that there are other problems that result from tooth loss?

For starters, if you have lost enough teeth, eating may become more difficult, in particular healthy foods, such as fruits and vegetables. This is one of the main reasons that inadequate dental care frequently results in nutritional deficiency.

Another very serious issue that results from missing teeth is bone loss. We sometimes refer to this as a “hidden consequence,” because you may not actually see or feel this issue right away. Did you know that bone is actually living tissue that needs constant stimulation to maintain its form and density? Thus, when a tooth is lost, the bone in the jaw that surrounded and supported that tooth melts away. There is a 25% decrease in width of bone during the first year after tooth loss and an overall 4 millimeters decrease in height over the next few years. The longer you have missing teeth, the greater the loss of bone.

As bone loss continues, it can actually affect the structure of your face. If you lose your teeth early in adulthood, by age 45 you might start to notice sunken cheeks. By age 60, your cheeks and lips will lose their support, resulting in a collapsed and aged look. If your teeth are not replaced, this process will continue, and you will be in danger of losing much of the structural support of your lips and cheeks.

Luckily, we can use dental implants to not only restore your smile, but also to halt this bone loss. Implants look, feel and function like your natural teeth and are made of titanium, which has the unique ability to fuse with your living bone. Among the many benefits of implants, they continue to provide stimulation to your bone, preventing further bone loss.

With a success rate of more than 95%, implants are the best long-term solution for tooth replacement.

If you would like more information about implants and bone loss, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “The Hidden Consequences of Losing Teeth.”

TheDifferencesBetweenOneandTwo-StageDentalImplants

The best method for permanently replacing a missing tooth is with a dental implant. But did you know that there are two main techniques for placing implants? Implants can be placed either using a one stage or a two stage surgical technique, and as their names suggests, one is performed in one step while the other requires a second surgery.

With a one-stage procedure, a healing abutment is placed at the time of surgery. An abutment is a connector that attaches the implant from the bone into the mouth and which protrudes through the gum tissues. Following a 3 to 6 month healing period in which the implant fuses to the bone, a crown is then placed on the implant restoring the immediate appearance of a healthy, normal tooth. One-stage implant systems are generally used when the bone quality is good, guaranteeing good initial implant stability. They are also used when cosmetics is not a concern, such as the back areas of the mouth.

Under special conditions an implant can be placed and a crown placed on top of it at the same time. However, this is a very special circumstance requiring ideal conditions and surgical experience as well as crown fabrication know-how. It is generally safer and wiser not to subject an implant to biting forces until it is fully healed and integrated with the supporting bone.

A two-stage procedure is typically used for replacing teeth where there is no immediate need for a cosmetic solution and when more of a margin of safety is required. With this approach, the implant(s) are placed into the jawbone and the gum tissues cover them. They are not exposed to the mouth, but stay buried and left to heal. Once healed, a second surgery is performed to attach an abutment for securing the crown in place. This approach is used when there is poorer bone quality or quantity. This may make it necessary to regenerate bone around the implant at the time of its placement. There may also be other health considerations dictating that a two-stage approach may be indicated.

Depending on your individual situation and medical status, our implant team will determine which approach is best for you. To learn more about these two procedures, read the Dear Doctor article, “Staging Surgery In Implant Dentistry.” You are also welcome to contact us to discuss your questions or to schedule an appointment.